Announcement of Board 52 Editorial Board

 

Board 52′s Masthead is available here

Announcement of Board 52 Editorial Board

The Houston Law Review is thrilled and honored to welcome and congratulate the newly elected editors of Board 52. They will work closely alongside their counterparts for the remainder of the semester to ensure an efficient and productive transition. We are confident that the Board 52 editors have the skills and the talent to lead the organization and carry out the objectives of the Review.

Announcement of Board 51 Editorial Board

The Houston Law Review is thrilled and honored to welcome and congratulate the newly elected editors of Board 51. They will work closely alongside their counterparts for the remainder of the semester to ensure an efficient and productive transition. We are confident that the Board 51 editors have the skills and the talent to lead the organization and carry out the objectives of the Review.

Houston Law Review Again Ranked Among the Top 2.5% of all Worldwide Legal Journals

The Houston Law Review is ranked 42nd out of more than 1,680 worldwide law journals by the 2011 Washington & Lee law journal rankings. According to Washington & Lee, the Houston Law Review ranks in the top 2.5% internationally and is the second-ranked legal journal in the state of Texas. The Review has now been ranked among the top 50 worldwide in each of Washington & Lee’s historical annual surveys, which date back to 2004. The rankings are based on the number of times academics and judges have cited Houston Law Review articles in court opinions and other scholarly articles.

The Review’s consistently high rankings are due to institutional pride, constant hard work, and the continued support of a number of people and organizations—the Frankel Family Foundation, the University of Houston Institute for Intellectual Property & Information Law, the Houston Law Review Board of Directors, the Houston Law Review Alumni Association, and the University of Houston Law Center faculty. The Review wishes to thank these organizations and their members, as well as all former student editors, who have worked countless hours to ensure the continued high quality of the Houston Law Review.

Announcement of Board 50 Editorial Board

The Houston Law Review is honored to announce the appointment of the Board 50 editorial board. These editors will work closely with their counterparts on Board 49 for the remainder of the semester and will take over the leadership of the Review in May. The editors of Board 50 are eager to lead the organization for the next year, and Board 49 is proud to announce their arrival.

The incoming Editor in Chief, Peter Danysh, and the incoming Managing Editor, Cade Mason, commented:

“On behalf of the members of Board 50, we are thrilled to begin the transition into our new positions on the Houston Law Review Board of Editors. Board 49 has been a constant source of guidance and professionalism, and we look forward to working together with the same amount of dedication. We are confident that Board 50 will demonstrate the work ethic and leadership necessary to ensure that the Houston Law Review remains such a vital part of the University of Houston Law Center and the legal community.”

Board 50’s Masthead is available here.

Announcement of Board 50

Board 49 is thrilled to welcome 45 new members to the Houston Law Review. We are in the midst of our first print cycle of the semester, and the new members of Board 50 are already proving to be valuable contributors to the organization. Each new member displays the work ethic, earnestness, and commitment to the Law Review that has so strongly characterized past members. Board 50’s impressive abilities give us no doubt of a bright and successful future.

A complete masthead is available here

Houston Law Review Ranked in the Top 2.3% of Journals World-Wide, According to Washington & Lee

The Houston Law Review is ranked 39th among law journals this year in the Washington & Lee law journal rankings–an increase of six spots from last year’s ranking. According to Washington & Lee’s combined rankings, approximately 1,660 journals were included. Of those, the Houston Law Review is among the top 2.3% world-wide. This makes the Houston Law Review one of the top two ranked journals in the state of Texas (second only to the Texas Law Review). These rankings illustrate the continued dedication of both the student editors and the Houston legal community–especially Review alumni. The student editorial board would like to thank the continued support of our faculty, the University of Houston IPIL program, the Houston Law Review Board of Directors, our Houston Law Review Alumni Association, and the Frankel Family. These people continue to support the Review in our many endeavors. Without them, our success would not be possible. We would also like to thank the many student editors who have worked countless hours over the past years to maintain the high quality of the Review.

To see the rankings, visit http://lawlib.wlu.edu/lj/index.aspx. Then “check” the 2010 combined score box and click “submit.”

Announcement of Board 49 Editorial Board

The Houston Law Review is honored to announce the appointment of the Board 49 editorial board. These individuals will work alongside the current editorial board for the remainder of the semester preparing to take the reins in May. Board 49 has exemplified the character and dedication of the Houston Law Review so far this year, and we are thrilled to be leaving the Review in such capable hands. We look forward to working with Board 49 throughout this semester.

The incoming Editor in Chief, Matthew Hoffman, and the Managing Editor, Katharine Larson, commented:

“The members of Board 49 are excited about transitioning into their new positions on the Houston Law Review Board of Editors.  Board 48′s consistent display of professionalism and hard work provides an example to Board 49 of what it will take to continue the efficient operation of the Law Review.  The energy, ideas, and diligence of the new Board of Editors will ensure that the Houston Law Review maintains its unparalleled quality and high regard throughout the legal community under our care.”

The Board 49 Masthead is available here.

Introducing HLRe, Houston Law Review’s New Online Publication

The Houston Law Review is pleased to announce our new online publication, HLRe. This new online journal is more than an extension of our printed publication: HLRe will focus on the practical side of lawyering and feature articles and essays on practical legal topics. The goal of HLRe is to present articles that are useful to current and upcoming practitioners.

Our first issue is scheduled for publication in February, 2011. It will feature a spotlight piece on Judge Gray Miller, and articles by two prominent Houston area attorneys. Still Room for Improvement: Assisting the Trier-of-Fact in the 2nd Decade of Daubert, co-authored by Sofia Adrogué of Looper Reed & McGraw and Alan Ratliff of the StoneTurn Group, analyzes recent expert witness jurisprudence. The Consequences of the Vanishing Trial: Does Anyone Really Care? by David Beck of Beck Redden & Secrest reflects on the plight of the jury trial in light of economic pressures and modern trends favoring settlement and arbitration.

HLRe provides an opportunity for practitioners to share knowledge and insight with the legal community, while at the same time supporting Houston Law Review. For more information, see the HLRe submissions information or email the Chief HLRe Editor at hlre@houstonlawreview.org.

Houston Law Review Member Receives Award from the Labor and Employment Law Section of the State Bar of Texas

The Labor and Employment Section of the State Bar of Texas recently selected a note by Houston Law Review member Jordan Kaplan as the “Best 2009 Student Law Review Article in the Field of Labor and Employment Law.” Jordan’s note was displayed by the Labor and Employment Section of the State Bar of Texas at the State Bar’s annual meeting. The note, entitled “Help Is on the Way: A Recent Case Sheds Light on Workplace Bullying,” is scheduled for publication in Issue 47:1 of the Houston Law Review.

Jordan is a member of Board 47, and currently serves as an Articles Editor. He received a $1000 prize for having his note selected for the award.

Houston Law Review Announces Case for 2009 Transfer Student Write-on Competition

The Houston Law Review is pleased to announce the case selected for the 2009 Transfer Student Write-on Competition.

Pleasant Grove City v. Summum, No. 07-665, 555 U.S. ___ (2009).

For complete details on the Write-on Competition, see the Write-on Competition information page.

Good luck.

Houston Law Review Announces Case for 2009 Write-on Competition

The Houston Law Review is pleased to announce the case selected for the 2009 Write-on Competition.

Negusie v. Holder, No. 07-499, 555 U.S. ___ (2009).

For complete details on the Write-on Competition, see the Write-On Competition information page.

Good Luck.

Houston Law Review Article on Hazing Newly Relevant in Light of Recent Case

Several members of the varsity cheer leading squad at Morton Ranch High School in Katy, TX were charged as adults with hazing, a Class B misdemeanor that could bring a maximum six-month jail sentence and a $2,000 fine upon conviction. Helen Eriksen, Brian Rogers & Allan Turner, Morton Ranch cheerleaders indicted in hazing, Hous. Chron., Nov. 20, 2008.

Criminal hazing was the subject of a 2002 Houston Law Review articleScott R. Rosner & R. Brian Crow, Institutional Liability for Hazing in Interscholastic Sports, 39 Hous. L. Rev. 275 (2002). The article was mentioned in media coverage of the event. Above the Law, Grand Jury Overreaction Indictment of the Day: ‘Mean Girls’ Get No Love In Texas.

News: Houston Law Review Article on Death Penalty Profiled in New York Times

Adam Liptak’s article A New Look at Race When Death is Sought prominently features an upcoming article in the Houston Law Review by Scott Phillips of the University of Denver, In Racial Disparities in the Capital of Capital Punishment.

Yet Harris County’s capital justice system has not been the subject of intensive research — until now. A new study to be published in The Houston Law Review this fall has found two sorts of racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty there, one commonplace and one surprising.